Groups

  • House Aset: The Kemetic Order of Aset Ka
    • The Kemetic Order of Aset Ka, or House Aset as it is often shorthanded, is one of the oldest vampyre groups around, particularly known for its secrecy. Only somewhat recently have they begun establishing a public identity, with the Asetian Bible being published in 2007. Not long after the inception of the Aset Ka website, many curious cats came wandering down this road of mystery and oftentimes dead ends – and with their open statement of secrecy, it is no wonder that House Aset is so intriguing.
  • House Quinotaur
    • There really isn't much to say about them; they are a fairly tame bunch from what I can find. They don't even have a House-originated religion – it's just a social networking site for Quinotarii.
  • How I started NOVA
    • Lately there has been a lot of questions on various lists, groups and gatherings about “how can I start a vampire group in my area?” with the most resounding and often used answer being “go to meetup.com and start a group”… This gets a bit on the pricey side after a while. So, in the spirit of sharing, I thought I would write down how I personally did this.
  • Joining a House, Church or Other Organization
    • If the group is online, check out their website, see if they have any membership information and requirements. (Most websites will have a link of this nature, even if it's just to a page that says "Sorry, we're not accepting any new applicants at this time.") Read the requirements before applying for membership - if they expect a lot of in-person attendance at events and meetings, and you're several states away, then it's probably not a good match.
  • Temple of the Vampire
    • This details quite fully the hypocrisy and greed shown from the administration heading the ToV. One key fact I have always warned people of was that they claim you must buy their book, The Vampire Bible, to become a vampyre, and must study it over the course of many, many months and years to ascend in strength when it is quite obvious that reading a book does not make one a vampyre.
  • Temple Sahjaza
    • Beginning as a coven led by women, for women in the early '70s, Temple Sahjaza is one of the oldest Houses/Covens/Temples still around today. Taking its inspiration from various female-dominated cultures throughout history, the founding members saw women as the, "...[embodiment] of life an death itself." (source)